2002 - 2003 Sociology Courses

SOC

105

Introduction to Sociology, LE

(4)

An introduction to the sociological perspective, its nature, and its scope. Examines group life, social organizations, culture, social institutions, social problems, social control, and social change.

SOC

200/300

Special Topics in Sociology

(1-4)

The exploration of issues, problems, and innovations in sociology. Provides individual and group experience.

SOC

200FN

Social Sciences Foundation Course II, LE

(4)

This course is designed to increase students' breadth of knowledge of the field of social science by providing an opportunity to think about and discuss issues relevant to the field. Students will be introduced to specific disciplines, but the focus of the course is to integrate them into an interdisciplinary understanding of human behavior. The objectives of the course are: (1) to familiarize students with the research methods used by social scientists; (2) to allow students the opportunity to apply a social science perspective to real world situations; (3) to facilitate an understanding of the similarities and differences found among the various disciplines. Same as ANTH/PSYC 200FN.

SOC

245

Human Sexuality: A Re-Evaluation of Identity and Sexuality

(4)

Students explore issues of maleness and femaleness. Emphasis is placed on identifying and evaluating value systems relating to sexuality. The impact of cultural definitions on individual behavior is also examined. Attention is directed toward societal ramifications of shifting roles with the intention of evaluating new alternatives open to men and women. A final emphasis is placed on understanding sexual functioning and different means of sexual expression.

SOC

253

Sociology of the Family, LE

(4)

The dynamics of family interaction and the changing structure and functions of the family institution. The effect of economic, social, demographic, and cultural changes in male-female relationships, marriage, divorce, sex roles, child care, etc., are analyzed and discussed.

SOC

313

Introduction to Social Theory

(4)

An introduction to selected social theorists and their contributions to understanding social behavior and problems. Students compare and analyze the strengths and advantages of each theory. Emphasis is placed on students developing the ability to understand, and account for, contemporary social trends and issues using the framework and insights provided by these theorists.

SOC

350

Gender in Society

(4)

Examines the socio-cultural construction of gender in the United States with some cross-cultural comparisons. It makes generalizations about how the experiences of men and women differ in this society and also looks at different experiences based on region, class, religion, and ethnicity. Comparisons are then made about gender based experiences in other societies and how they are related to the wider culture.

SOC

355

Sociology of Health, Illness, and Health Care

(4)

Introduces students to the sociological aspects of health, illness, and health care. Reviews the social sources of illness and the social distribution of illness in the United States. Students learn to think sociologically and critically about health care providers, health insurance, health care settings, and the challenges facing individuals who are seeking good health care.

SOC

358

Sociology of the Aging

(4)

An introduction to human aging (gerontology), its causes, and consequences. As a multi-disciplinary field of social science, the current theories, research findings, and trends of aging are covered. Special emphasis is placed on examining the specific problems of aged Americans such as social isolation, discrimination, poverty, and the availability of social services.

SOC

370

Juvenile Delinquency

(4)

A consideration of the nature of delinquency, including an analysis of prevention, causes, treatment methods, and the juvenile justice system.

SOC

371

Social Problems

(4)

This class examines specific American social problems which are identified by students at the beginning of the class. Students learn to make connections between problems and to understand the role that our social structure plays in causing and perpetuating these issues. The course has an experiential component in which students can apply sociological analysis to understanding community concerns. Recommended but not required: SOC 105.

SOC

372

Race and Ethnicity

(4)

Covers the varied historical and present-day experiences of different ethnic groups in the United States. Discusses human variation and the social consequences of the cultural construction of racial categories. Studies prejudice and discrimination including the economic, political and social reasons for changes in immigration policy.

SOC

390

Research Methods

(4)

A survey of the scientific methods of data collection as a means of approaching problems in anthropology, political science, psychology, and sociology. Laboratory exercises illustrating the various methods are required. Strongly recommended for students considering graduate school. Prerequisites: PSYC 105 or SOC 105; MATH 150. Same as PSYC 390.

SOC

400

Seminar in Social Science

(4)

Informal group experience for advanced students to explore issues, problems, and innovations in the social sciences field. Prerequisite: senior standing or consent of instructor.

SOC

401

Directed Studies

(1-3)

A tutorial-based course used only for student-initiated proposals for intensive individual study of topics not otherwise offered in the Sociology Program. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and school dean.

SOC

420

Contemporary Issues

(4)

Using a seminar format, this class examines opposing viewpoints on selected important, enduring, and controversial social issues. Students research, analyze and debate topics such as the power structure of America, the value of welfare, and the dehumanization of work.

SOC

440

Internship

(1-8)

Offers students the opportunity to integrate classroom knowledge with practical experience. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing (for transfer students, at least 15 hours completed at Westminster), minimum 2.5 GPA, completion of the Career Resource Center Internship Workshop, and consent of program director and Career Center Internship Coordinator.

SOC

450

Methods of Teaching Social Sciences

(3)

Preparation for secondary education students to teach history and the social sciences. Includes methods of teaching knowledge, thinking, skills, and attitudes in the context of all of the social sciences. Prerequisite: admission to the Teacher Education Programs.