2004-2005 Sociology Course Descriptions

2004 - 2005 Sociology Course Descriptions

SOC

105

Introduction to Sociology, LE

(4)

An introduction to the sociological perspective, its nature, and its scope. Examines group life, social organizations, culture, social institutions, social problems, social control, and social change.


SOC

200/300

Special Topics in Sociology

(1-4)

The exploration of issues, problems, and innovations in sociology. Provides individual and group experience.


SOC

200FN

Social Sciences Foundation Course II, LE

(4)

This course is designed to increase students' breadth of knowledge of the field of social science by providing an opportunity to think about and discuss issues relevant to the field. Students will be introduced to specific disciplines, but the focus of the course is to integrate them into an interdisciplinary understanding of human behavior. The objectives of the course are: (1) to familiarize students with the research methods used by social scientists; (2) to allow students the opportunity to apply a social science perspective to real world situations; (3) to facilitate an understanding of the similarities and differences found among the various disciplines. Same as ANTH/PSYC 200FN.


SOC

245

Human Sexuality

(4)

Students explore issues of maleness and femaleness. Emphasis is placed on identifying and evaluating value systems relating to sexuality. The impact of cultural definitions on individual behavior is also examined. Attention is directed toward societal ramifications of shifting roles with the intention of evaluating new alternatives open to men and women. A final emphasis is placed on understanding sexual functioning and different means of sexual expression.


SOC

253

Sociology of the Family, LE

(4)

The dynamics of family interaction and the changing structure and functions of the family institution. The effect of economic, social, demographic, and cultural changes in male-female relationships, marriage, divorce, sex roles, child care, etc., are analyzed and discussed.


SOC

270

Introduction to Social Work

(4)

This course is designed for students who are interested in learning about or pursuing a career in social work. Providing a comprehensive overview of the profesion, the course will introduce students to social work theories, goals, values, ethics, skills, practices, services, and challenges.


SOC

313

Introduction to Social Theory

(4)

An introduction to selected social theorists and their contributions to understanding social behavior and problems. Students compare and analyze the strengths and advantages of each theory. Emphasis is placed on students developing the ability to understand, and account for, contemporary social trends and issues using the framework and insights provided by these theorists. Prerequisite: SOC 105.


SOC

320

Sociology of Popular Culture

(4)

This course explores the social implications of popular culture. Focusing on film, television, music, fashion, books, magazines, the Internet, and other forms of entertainment, the course critically examines how popular culture is produced, disseminated, consumed, interpreted, and experienced in the United States.


SOC

330

Sports and Society

(4)

This course explores sports as a significant cultural, political, and economic force in American society. Focusing on both established and alternative sports, the course incorporates a sociological perspective to critically examine how sports are organized, played, experienced, observed, perceived, and critiqued in the United States.


SOC

350

Gender in Society

(4)

Examines the socio-cultural construction of gender in the United States with some cross-cultural comparisons. It makes generalizations about how the experiences of men and women differ in this society and also looks at different experiences based on region, class, religion, and ethnicity. Comparisons are then made about gender based experiences in other societies and how they are related to the wider culture.


SOC

370

Juvenile Delinquency

(4)

A consideration of the nature of delinquency, including an analysis of prevention, causes, treatment methods, and the juvenile justice system.


SOC

372

Race, Ethnicity and Class

(4)

Covers the varied historical and present-day experiences of different ethnic groups in the United States. Discusses human variation and the social consequences of the cultural construction of racial categories. Studies prejudice and discrimination including the economic, political and social reasons for changes in immigration policy.


SOC

390

Quantitative Research Methods

(4)

A survey of the scientific methods of data collection as a means of approaching problems in anthropology, political science, psychology, and sociology. Laboratory exercises illustrating the various methods are required. Strongly recommended for students considering graduate school. Prerequisites: MATH 150. Same as PSYC 390.


SOC

391

Qualitative Research Methods

(4)

This course teaches students how to make use of qualitative research methods to look at social issues. First, the students learn about qualitative research and how it differs from, and complements, quantitative research methods. They then conduct a literature review and an ethno-historical review to prepare to choose a particular topic of interest. Finally, they prepare a research design. This may include preliminary propositions, hypotheses, or simply questions, and a statement of how the answers to these questions will be pursued in the field. Prerequisites: SOC 105 or ANTH 160 or PSYC 105, or consent of the instructor.


SOC

400

Seminar in Social Science

(4)

Informal group experience for advanced students to explore issues, problems, and innovations in the social sciences field. Prerequisite: senior standing or consent of instructor.


SOC

401

Directed Studies

(1-3)

A tutorial-based course used only for student-initiated proposals for intensive individual study of topics not otherwise offered in the Sociology Program. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and school dean.


SOC

420

Contemporary Issues

(4)

This course explores contemporary issues from a social problems perspective. Focusing on various current issues such as poverty, unemployment, crime, substance abuse, terrorism, racism, discrimination, and sexual inequality, the course utilizes sociological analysis to examine how contemporary issues are defined-and dealt with-in American society.


SOC

440

Internship

(1-8)

Offers students the opportunity to integrate classroom knowledge with practical experience. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing (for transfer students, at least 15 hours completed at Westminster), minimum 2.5 GPA, completion of the Career Resource Center Internship Workshop, and consent of program director and Career Center Internship Coordinator.


SOC

450

Methods of Teaching Social Sciences

(3)

Preparation for secondary education students to teach history and the social sciences. Includes methods of teaching knowledge, thinking, skills, and attitudes in the context of all of the social sciences. Prerequisite: admission to the Teacher Education Programs.


SOC

470

Senior Project/Thesis

(4 or 2 - 2)

A senior project or thesis is required of all sociology and social science academic majors. Sociology majors will sign up for four credit hours in one semester. Social science majors will spread these hours over two semesters so that they can work with two instructors from different disciplines. Those who opt to conduct a community project will extend the work done in their research methods course and carry out the necessary fieldwork: a minimum of four interviews and two participant observations, or data analysis. Those who opt to write a thesis will focus on research, the synthesis of information, analysis, and writing techniques concerning a particular topic in sociology (for sociology majors) or the social sciences (for social science majors). All majors signing up for the project or thesis must have completed either SOC 390 (after having first completed MATH 150 as a prerequisite for SOC 390) or SOC 391. To take the thesis, all students must have senior standing, a declared major in sociology or social science, and consent of the instructor.