WCore | Westminster's New Core Curriculum Website
WCore

Engage, Explore, Experience, Extend

WCore is Westminster College’s new liberal education program, and it will start for all incoming students in the fall of 2016. WCore gives students the opportunity to explore new subjects and ideas through unique courses. WCore courses offer small-group settings and focus on synthesis, communication, and disciplinary research rather than simply memorizing facts. Additionally, because WCore has fewer requirements, students will have more room in their schedules to pursue minors and electives.

 

Navigating WCore:

WCore is designed to be flexible. This is one possible path through your individualized WCore curriculum:

  • During your first year, you’ll Engage with your fellow students in a learning community and a faculty-led Explorations course.
  • As a sophomore, you can deeply Explore a subject by taking WSeminars with topics such as Math and Computer Animation or Dinosaur Paleobiology.
  • When you’re a junior, you’ll Experience beyond Westminster through the Engaging the World platform. Maybe you’ll take a May Term trip or participate in a local service-learning course. There are so many options. The choice is up to you.
  • Finally, as a senior, you’ll Extend your learning through a capstone project and share it with others in a campus-wide Celebrating Your Path event.

 

WCore Class Examples:

Vampires: Active Reading, Passive Reading

Fine Arts and Humanities »
Vampires: Active Reading, Passive Reading

When we read, we seek a sense that the text has seized us, dominated our will, and taken control of our understanding. Vampires make excellent metaphors for the danger and thrill of being dominated by a text.

How We Die in America

Social and Behavioral Sciences »
How We Die in America

A light hearted yet in-depth look at what it means in American culture to die and how it is part of an integrated system of meanings and behaviors within a larger socio-cultural environment. Students examine this life experience empirically, with a group, through exploratory ethnographic research.

Counting Votes

Science and Mathematics »
Counting Votes

Just what does voting mean? There are many methods of expressing voting preferences via ballots. Which is the best method? How is a state’s number of representatives in the US House of Representatives determined? What other methods are there? We will take a mathematical look at these questions by studying Arrow’s Impossibility Theorem.

Social Entrepreneurship

Social and Behavioral Sciences »
Social Entrepreneurship

Are you interested in contributing to the greater good through the career you choose? Do you want to do ‘good’ for others without sacrificing your own economic well-being? Well, now you can. In this course you will learn about the growing phenomenon known as social entrepreneurship. In this class you will learn the theory behind social entrepreneurship and you will immerse yourself in the local economy of mission-driven startups in the for-profit and not-for-profit sectors.

National Parks Geology

Science and Mathematics »
National Parks Geology

Many of America’s National Parks were designated because of their geologic beauty and history. This course will examine geologic principles and concepts through the lens of America’s National Parks, as they often represent the most exquisite examples of geologic phenomena.

Immigration, Education and Equality

Social and Behavioral Sciences »
Immigration, Education and Equality

This course will explore ways in which context, race, culture, and social class shape immigrants' educational trajectories. We will read and analyze accounts of immigrants' experiences in public schools, sample research on immigration and education, and critique perspectives regarding immigrant success in United States society. We will explore differences in the educational outcomes of past and current immigrants and explore the role of schools and other community organizations in the lives of immigrant youth. Through community engagement, we will learn from and work with immigrant youth.

Drawing Lines in the Sand

Fine Arts and Humanities »
Drawing Lines in the Sand

This hybrid studio-seminar course examines art about landscape, space, and environments while simultaneously challenging students to engage with these ideas in their own creative work. Students will research artworks and writings that explore topics such as landscape, “wild” and urban space, public and private spaces, and land(scapes) and power. This course will also introduce students to fundamental drawing techniques, with a special focus on drawings and images made using landscape, nature, and hybridized arrangements of visual communication.

Aging Matters

Social and Behavioral Sciences »
Aging Matters

The goal of this course is to prepare students to describe the complexity and diversity of older adults, explore ways to work effectively with older adults and promote healthy aging. Students will examine aspects of aging within historical, cultural, physical, mental, emotional, social, spiritual, economic and interpersonal contexts. The impact of an increased aging population on society and how society cares for the aging population will be a central theme of the course.