During orientation, students and employees are informed about campus security procedures and are encouraged to be responsible for their own security and the security of others. Additional programs designed to inform the campus community on how to prevent crimes are held throughout the year. Programs such as presentations by the Salt Lake Rape Recovery Center, a Health and Wellness Fair, educational programs during National Substance Abuse Week, and a seminar on Freedom Responsibility emphasizing personal choice and accountability are often presented. The college also has screening available for alcohol abuse, eating disorders, and depression.

Westminster College offers a substance and alcohol abuse education and prevention service for the students and employees of Westminster College.

The college will use educational and informational resources available to help students gain an insight into this complex subject and to minimize the need for disciplinary action. The college encourages students with problems or questions pertaining to drug use to seek professional help through the Student Services Counseling Center or through the Office of the Dean of Students. It should be emphasized that all matters discussed in this regard will be kept in confidence.

The Office of Student Life serves as a resource for the identification and referral to treatment and rehabilitation services for those students experiencing problems related to substance abuse. The college counselors are available for individual counseling and/or evaluation of a substance or alcohol problem.

Westminster College has an Employee Assistance Program (EAP). This program provides confidential access to professional counseling services for help in confronting such personal problems as alcohol and other substance abuse, marital and family difficulties, financial or legal troubles, and emotional distress. The EAP is available to all employees and their immediate family members by offering problem assessment, short-term counseling, and referral to appropriate community and private services.

The EAP is strictly confidential and is designed to safeguard the employee's privacy and rights. Information given to the EAP counselor may be released only if requested by the employee in writing. All counselors are guided by a Professional Code of Ethics. There is no cost for employees to consult with an EAP counselor. If further counseling is necessary, the EAP counselor will outline community and private services available. The counselor will also let employees know whether any costs associated with private services may be covered by their health insurance plan. Costs that are not covered are the responsibility of the employee.

Alcohol is psychologically and physically addictive. The risks of using alcohol also include respiratory depression; depression of the immune system; increased risk of heart disease, cancer, accidents, or hypertension; brain damage; damage to unborn fetus; or impotence at high-dosage levels. Mothers who drink alcohol during pregnancy may give birth to infants with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. These infants often have irreversible physical abnormalities and mental disabilities. Research shows that children of alcoholic parent are at greater risk of becoming alcoholics.

High doses of alcohol cause respiratory depression and death. If combined with other depressants of the central nervous system, much lower doses of alcohol will produce the effects just described. Repeated use of alcohol can lead to dependence. Sudden cessation of alcohol intake is likely to produce withdrawal symptoms including severe anxiety, tremors, hallucinations, and convulsions. Alcohol withdrawal can be life threatening. Long-term consumption of large quantities of alcohol, particularly when combined with poor nutrition, can also lead to permanent damage to vital organs such as the brain and liver.

Driving Under the Influence (DUI)

It is illegal to drive or be in physical control of a vehicle, even when parked, while under the influence of alcohol or other drugs. Utah's Implied Consent Law requires submission to a blood alcohol content (BAC) test. Refusal will result in revocation of your license for one year. You are in violation if your BAC is .08 or greater or the officer judges you to be impaired.

Penalties

Class B misdemeanor for the first and second conviction of driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs

Sentencing

  1. Not less than 48 hours in jail,
  2. Serve 48 hours in a compensatory-service work program
  3. Pay a fine of not less than $700

Class A misdemeanor for the following

  1. Bodily injury was inflicted upon another person
  2. There was a passenger under 16 years of age in the vehicle at the time of the offense
  3. Was 21 years of age or older and had a passenger under 18 years of age at the time of the offense

Sentencing

  1. Not less than 240 hours in jail
  2. Serve 240 hours in a compensatory-service work program
  3. Pay a fine of not less than $800

Third degree felony for the following

  1. Inflects serious bodily injury upon another
  2. The person has two or more convictions, each of which is within ten years of the current conviction.
  3. If the conviction is at any time after a conviction of automobile homicide that is committed after July 1, 2001

Note: A person is guilty of a separate offense for each victim suffering bodily injury or serious bodily injury or death.

Sentencing: if the court suspends prison time and places the defendant on probation, the court shall impose

  1. A jail sentence of not less than 1500 hours
  2. Pay a fine of not less than $1500
  3. Place under a supervised probation
  4. An order requiring the person to obtain a screening and assessment and substance abuse treatment at a substance abuse program providing intensive care or inpatient treatment and long term care closely supervised follow-through after treatment for not less than 240 hours.

Suspension of driver license

If a person is 21 years of age or older at the time of arrest, The Driver License Division will suspend the operator's license of a person convicted for the first time of an offense committed on or after July 1, 2009; and revoke for a period of two years the license of a person if the person if the person has a prior conviction and the current driving under the influence violation is committed within a period of ten years from the date of the prior violation and on or after July 1, 2009.

Minors in Possession (MIP)

It is illegal for minors (under 21) to buy, possess (even hold), or drink alcohol. Penalties: Up to six months imprisonment and/or a $1,000 fine; Class B misdemeanor. When a minor who is at least 18 years old, but younger than 21 years old, is found in violation of this law, the court hearing the case shall suspend the minor's driving privileges

Not-a-Drop Law

It is illegal for anyone under 21 years of age to operate a vehicle while there is any measurable alcohol (less than .08) in his or her body. Penalties: Loss of license for 120 days or until the person is 21 years old, whichever is longer, required substance abuse assessment, and may face MIP laws. A second offense within ten of a prior denial or suspension and committed on or after July 1, 2009 will results in suspension until the person is 21 or for a period of two years whichever is longer.

Open Container

It is illegal to drink any alcoholic beverage while operating, or as a passenger in, a vehicle (parked or moving), or have an open container in a vehicle. Once a container is opened, one can be arrested for possession. Violating an open container law is a Class B misdemeanor with a maximum penalty of six months imprisonment and/or $1,000 fine.

Minors

It is illegal to sell or supply alcohol to a minor. Penalties: Up to one year imprisonment and/or up to $2,500 fine; Class A misdemeanor.

Intoxication

It is illegal to drink in a public building, park, or stadium or to be so intoxicated that you disturb others or injure yourself or others. Maximum penalty is 90 days imprisonment and/or $750 fine; Class C misdemeanor. It is also illegal to sell or supply to intoxicated persons or to purchase alcohol if intoxicated. Maximum penalty is six months imprisonment and/or $1,000 fine; Class B misdemeanor.

Unlawful Transfer or Use of Identification Card

It is illegal to give or use another's identification card to (1) procure alcoholic beverages, (2) gain admittance where alcohol is sold or consumed, and (3) obtain employment that requires employees to handle alcoholic products. Maximum penalty: six months imprisonment and/or $1,000 fine; Class B misdemeanor.

Dram Shop Liability

This refers to any person who provides alcoholic beverages illegally to underage persons or who provides alcohol to someone who is apparently intoxicated or, given the circumstances, may be under the influence of alcohol or other drugs. If the intoxicated person causes injury to persons or property while intoxicated, the person who furnished the alcohol is liable for injuries, property, or support to any third person or their spouse, child, or parent.

Federal and Utah state laws make it illegal to possess or possess with intent to sell, manufacture, or sell and/or deliver any of the following drugs:

Marijuana

Includes THC, hashish, hash oil, and tetrahydrocannabinol. Risks include psychological and physical addiction; increased risk of lung cancer, bronchitis, or emphysema; heart disease; fatigue; paranoia; or psychosis; withdrawal symptoms include insomnia, hyperactivity, suppressed appetite, depressed immune system, decreased sperm count, irregular ovulation, or possible sperm and ovum damage.

Federal Penalties
  1. Under 50 kg., five years and $250,000; 50–100 kg., maximum 20 years and $1 million
  2. 100–1,000 kg., maximum five to 40 years and $2 million; more than 1,000 kg., minimum 10 years to life and $4 million
Utah Penalties for Possession
  1. Under one oz., up to six months and/or $1,000, Class B misdemeanor
  2. One to 16 oz., up to one year and/or $2,500, Class A misdemeanor
  3. 16 oz. or more, up to five years and/or $5,000, third-degree felony
Utah Penalties for Intent to Distribute

Up to five years and/or up to $5,000; third-degree felony (second-degree felony on campus).

Narcotics 1

Includes heroin, hallucinogens such as LSD and mescaline, and peyote. Risks of use include psychological and physical addiction, depression, withdrawal, convulsion, unpredictable behavior, and damage to unborn fetus.

Federal Penalties

Five to 40 years imprisonment depending on amount up to 10 years to life; $2–4 million.

State Penalties
  1. Up to five (5) years and/or $5,000 for possession; third-degree felony (second-degree felony on campus)
  2. From one (1) to 15 years and/or $10,000 for intent to distribute; second-degree felony (first-degree felony on campus)
Narcotics 2

Includes opium, morphine, methadone, or codeine; depressants or some barbiturates; stimulants such as cocaine, some amphetamines, or PCP. Risks include psychological and physical addiction, convulsions, respiratory failure, or damage to unborn fetus; agitation, hallucinations, or convulsions; elevated blood pressure, which can cause irregular heartbeat and death.

Federal Penalties

Five to 40 years to 10 years to life with a maximum fine of $2–4 million.

Utah Penalties
  1. Up to five years and/or $5,000; third-degree felony for possession (second-degree felony on campus)
  2. From one to 15 years and/or $10,000; second-degree felony for intent to distribute (first-degree felony on campus)
Stimulants

Includes some amphetamines; depressants, including some barbiturates; and some narcotics. Risks include psychological and physical addiction; potential liver damage, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, disorientation, coma, or damage to unborn fetus; or death; withdrawal symptoms include anxiety, tremors, insomnia, or convulsions.

Federal Penalties

Maximum five years and $250,000.

Utah Penalties
  1. Up to six months and/or $1,000; Class B misdemeanor for possession (Class A misdemeanor on campus)
  2. Up to five years and/or $5,000; third-degree felony for intent to distribute (second-degree felony on campus)
Depressants:

Includes the benzodiazepines (valium, librium, dalmane), chloral hydrates, some barbiturates, some stimulants, or some narcotics. Risks include psychological and physical addiction; drowsiness, muscle cramps, anxiety, tremors, insomnia, or convulsions; damage to unborn fetus; or death.

Federal Penalties

Maximum three years and $250,000.

Utah Penalties
  1. Up to six months and/or $1,000; Class B misdemeanor for possession (Class A misdemeanor on campus)
  2. Up to five (5) years and/or $5,000; third-degree felony for intent to distribute (second-degree felony on campus)
Chemical Compounds (in Smaller Quantities than Drugs Listed Above)

Risks include psychological and physical addiction; nausea, gastrointestinal symptoms, or drowsiness; withdrawal symptoms include runny nose, watery eyes, panic, chills, cramps, irritability, nausea, or damage to unborn fetus.

Federal Penalties

Maximum one year and $100,000.

Utah Penalties
  1. Up to six months and/or $1,000; Class B misdemeanor for possession (Class A misdemeanor on campus)
  2. Up to one (1) year and/or $2,500; Class A misdemeanor for intent to distribute (third-degree felony on campus)
Additional Utah Laws
Obtaining or Distributing under False Pretenses
Maximum penalty is five years imprisonment and/or $25,000 fine; third-degree felony.
Paraphernalia
Use, possession or sale of drug-related paraphernalia is illegal with a maximum penalty of five (5) years imprisonment and/or a $5,000 fine; third-degree felony.
Inhalants
Sale or use of psychotropic chemicals (glue, paint, etc.) to get high is illegal with a maximum penalty of six months imprisonment and/or $1,000 fine.
Imitation Controlled Substances
It is illegal to possess, manufacture, or sell imitation controlled substances. Maximum penalty: 90 days and/or $750 for possession (misdemeanor); one year and/or $2,500 for manufacture or sales (Class C misdemeanor). It is also illegal to purchase supplies and equipment necessary for the manufacture, transportation, and distribution of these substances.